Food update

A milestone update on Food: Generation Mars, Book Four

1) The entire book is plotted (or, at least, as plotted as I am willing to go while also leaving room for surprise). All I’ll say is that this one is monumental in scope and will take your breath in the first chapter and keep it until the last.

2) As of today, I passed 5000 words in the initial manuscript. A pittance in the face of this monster, but a milestone to be celebrated nonetheless.

image: generated by ImageFX

Rocket fuel

The next book is turning into an epic. Decided I needed more delta-v to pull it off. This oughta do it.

Sweet Maria’s, fueling writers and rocket scientists since 1997.

Envelopes

Is cannibalism appropriate for middle grade? Asking for a friend…

But seriously, this next book is shaping up to push the envelope. Several envelopes. All the envelopes, maybe.

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Hunger

“Hunger, or the fear of it, has always played a major role in determining the actions and attitudes of man. In every age and every land people have starved…”

More light reading in preparation for the next book in the Generation Mars series: Food.

Light reading

Some light reading for the next book. In 1945, thirty-six men volunteered for the first scientific study of the effects of starvation. It wasn’t pretty.

Really feeling sorry for my main characters right now. I had a cookie about an hour ago, and my stomach is already grumbling.

(Astute followers will notice this wasn’t in the to-read stack image I posted recently. Research requires flexibility.)

Transgenic lettuce

While the theme of food doesn’t come up until book four, I’m always on the lookout for relevant information. Here’s an interesting piece on the genetic modification of leafy greens to provide medication through diet.

From the article:
“A team of researchers at the University of California, Davis, have developed modified transgenic lettuce that produces a bone-stimulating hormone. The lettuce can be easily grown in space and could help strengthen an astronaut’s bones. It may even help reduce the risk of osteoporosis on Earth…”